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Department of the Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen offered members of the House Ways and Means Committee limited insight as to how the Biden Administration will handle the provisions of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act that are expiring in 2025.


The IRS has released guidance listing the specific changes in accounting method to which the automatic change procedures set forth in Rev. Proc. 2015-13, I.R.B. 2015-5, 419, apply. The latest guidance updates and supersedes the current list of automatic changes found in Rev. Proc. 2023-24, I.R.B. 2023-28, 1207.


The IRS intends to amend the base erosion and anti-abuse tax (BEAT) regulations under Code Secs. 59A and 6038A to defer the applicability date of the reporting of qualified derivative payments (QDPs) until tax years beginning on or after January 1, 2027. Until these reporting rules apply, the current transition period rules for QDP reporting will continue to apply.


In an effort to increase awareness of and participation in the alternative dispute resolution process, the Internal Revenue Service Independent Office of Appeals has formed an Alternative Dispute Resolution Program Management Office.


The IRS has released proposed regulations that provide guidance regarding information reporting of transactions with foreign trusts and receipt of large foreign gifts and regarding loans from, and uses of property of, foreign trusts. Further, the IRS has issued proposed amendments to the regulations relating to foreign trusts having one or more U.S. beneficiaries. The proposed regulations affect U.S. persons who engage in transactions with, or are treated as the owners of, foreign trusts, and U.S. persons who receive large gifts or bequests from foreign persons.


The Affordable Care Act—enacted nearly five years ago—phased in many new requirements affecting individuals and employers. One of the most far-reaching requirements, the individual mandate, took effect this year and will be reported on 2014 income tax returns filed in 2015. The IRS is bracing for an avalanche of questions about taxpayer reporting on 2014 returns and, if liable, any shared responsibility payment. For many taxpayers, the best approach is to be familiar with the basics before beginning to prepare and file their returns.


The answer is no for 2010, but yes, in practical terms, for 2014 and beyond. The health care reform package (the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 and the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010) does not require individuals to carry health insurance in 2010. However, after 2013, individuals without minimum essential health insurance coverage will be liable for a penalty unless otherwise exempt.